1. /implodes from stress/

  2. tiny-creatures:

Ốc Sên by Hai Hiu (2hiu) on Flickr.
    Reblogged from: ktsaurusr3x
  3. elysedc:

    The ultimate dad joke compilation

    Reblogged from: kergiby
  4. werewhisky:

    werewhisky:

    COMING UP: THE BEST LINE IN THE ENTIRE KINGDOM HEARTS SERIES

    image

    Reblogged from: kergiby
  5. biocanvas:

Tooth of a predatory marine snail
The predatory marine snail Conus ermineus lives in a shell between 2-4 inches in length. Like the barrel of a gun, Conus snails possess a battery of venom-loaded, harpoon-like teeth located within their throat with one tooth “loaded” and ready for use. When prey is detected, the snail rapidly fires the tooth and injects a potent cocktail of neurotoxins that paralyzes small fish almost instantly. The snail then retracts the tooth, reeling in the prey before swallowing it whole. Conus snails can fire these venomous harpoons in any direction (even backwards), and some of the loaded toxins can be fatal to humans.
Image by Dr. Alan Kohn and Dr. Joshua Kubo, University of Washington.

    biocanvas:

    Tooth of a predatory marine snail

    The predatory marine snail Conus ermineus lives in a shell between 2-4 inches in length. Like the barrel of a gun, Conus snails possess a battery of venom-loaded, harpoon-like teeth located within their throat with one tooth “loaded” and ready for use. When prey is detected, the snail rapidly fires the tooth and injects a potent cocktail of neurotoxins that paralyzes small fish almost instantly. The snail then retracts the tooth, reeling in the prey before swallowing it whole. Conus snails can fire these venomous harpoons in any direction (even backwards), and some of the loaded toxins can be fatal to humans.

    Image by Dr. Alan Kohn and Dr. Joshua Kubo, University of Washington.

    Reblogged from: libutron
  6. bethrevis:

chirotus:

constant-instigator:

ermefinedining:

This map should be included in every history book.

Oh wow! I’ve been wanting this for ages!

This needs to be in every history book along with a map showing where those nations have been pushed to now.

Reblogging in “honor” of Columbus Day…

    bethrevis:

    chirotus:

    constant-instigator:

    ermefinedining:

    This map should be included in every history book.

    Oh wow! I’ve been wanting this for ages!

    This needs to be in every history book along with a map showing where those nations have been pushed to now.

    Reblogging in “honor” of Columbus Day…

    Reblogged from: lamerperle
  7. libutron:

landture:

Ghosts in the Shadows by Alexmody

(Hurricane Ridge, Olympic National Park, Washington, US)

    libutron:

    landture:

    Ghosts in the Shadows by Alexmody

    (Hurricane Ridge, Olympic National Park, Washington, US)

    Reblogged from: libutron
  8. Got my ears pierced today finally. It’s so weird.

    Got my ears pierced today finally. It’s so weird.

  9. nubbsgalore:

    for a typical forty ton humpback to breach the ocean’s surface — and breach is taken to mean at least 40 percent of its body is out of the water — it needs to reach speeds of 29 km/h. on rare occasions, the whale will completely launch out of the water; rarer still is the photographer who manages to capture it. 

    reasons for the behaviour are debated and varied, and range from mere pleasure, to courtship, to shedding the skin of parasites. calves (like in the sixth photo) can often be seen breaching for long periods of time, and it’s not uncommon for an adult to make multiple breaches; the most recorded is 130 jumps in 90 minutes. 

    photos by (click pic) steven benjamin off the coast of port st. johns, south africa; flip nicklen in alaska and british columbia; tom soucek in fredrick sound, alaska; jon cornforth in alaska; jean waite off hawaii’s na pali coast; masa ushioda in hawaii; matthew thorton in tofino, bc; and christine callaghan in newfoundland’s bay of fundy (see also: previous breaching post)

    Reblogged from: dont-panic-zoology
  10. markscherz:

Uroplatus sp., probably U. phantasticus but could also be U. malama
Photo by Dennis H Miller.

    markscherz:

    Uroplatus sp., probably U. phantasticus but could also be U. malama

    Photo by Dennis H Miller.

    Reblogged from: markscherz
  11. silentfrost:

"Deshalb bin ich Wildlife-Fotograf…" by Andersfotografiert

    silentfrost:

    "Deshalb bin ich Wildlife-Fotograf…" by Andersfotografiert

    Reblogged from: biologizeable
  12. astronomy-to-zoology:

    Pheasant Coucal (Centropus phasianinus)

    …a species of cuckoo (Cuculidae) which occurs in eastern and northern Australia and Papua New Guinea, where it inhabits subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical/tropical mangrove forests.  Pheasant coucals are large (50-70 cm (20 to 28 in)) and are adapted for feeding on the ground, leading to their shape being reminiscent of a pheasant. Pheasant coucals are predominately carnivorous, feeding on small reptiles and amphibians, bird eggs/young, small mammals, and a range of insects. 

    Classification

    Animalia-Chordata-Aves-Cuculiformes-Cuculidae-Centropus-C. phasianinus

    Images: Greg Schechter and James Niland

    Reblogged from: biologizeable
  13. tangledupinblue8:

My dad even saw a pretty snake while they were away.

    tangledupinblue8:

    My dad even saw a pretty snake while they were away.

    Reblogged from: biologizeable
  14. markscherz:

jenniferrpovey:

ultrafacts:

Source Want more facts?, follow the Ultrafacts Blog

50 species of lizard and one species of snake reproduce through parthenogenesis (that’s the fancy word for producing offspring as a female without having sex).
Except.
Whiptails are stimulation ovulators. That is to say, they can’t ovulate without having sex.
So not only do they are give birth through immaculate conception, they’re ALL LESBIANS.
There are two kinds of parthenogenesis seen in reptiles. That used by whiptails and the other all female species is true cloning - the egg contains the female’s full genetic material).
Other species including komodo dragons use another form of parthenogenesis where they actually fertilize themselves, with a haploid polar body used instead of a sperm. Because of the way reptile sex chromosomes work, this form of parthenogenesis can produce males as well as females - however, the females produced have weird sex chromosomes and can only lay other females. It’s used as a backup reproductive strategy if they can’t find a mate. This works because in reptiles, unlike mammals, its the males that have two sex chromosomes the same (ZZ) and the females different (ZW). Females produced by parthenogenesis are WW - and that’s what happened to the whiptails. They lost the Z chromosome and now are all WWs.
IOW?
Reptiles are fascinating.


A similar situation is seen in Lepidodactylus lugubris. In this parthenogenic species, one in ~20 (my numbers might be off, don’t quote me) individuals is male. The females of course cannot be fertilised by the male, being parthenogenic, but copulation still seems to stimulate them to lay. In the absence of the male, females will apparently engage in lesbian copulations that also have this stimulatory function.

    markscherz:

    jenniferrpovey:

    ultrafacts:

    Source Want more facts?, follow the Ultrafacts Blog

    50 species of lizard and one species of snake reproduce through parthenogenesis (that’s the fancy word for producing offspring as a female without having sex).

    Except.

    Whiptails are stimulation ovulators. That is to say, they can’t ovulate without having sex.

    So not only do they are give birth through immaculate conception, they’re ALL LESBIANS.

    There are two kinds of parthenogenesis seen in reptiles. That used by whiptails and the other all female species is true cloning - the egg contains the female’s full genetic material).

    Other species including komodo dragons use another form of parthenogenesis where they actually fertilize themselves, with a haploid polar body used instead of a sperm. Because of the way reptile sex chromosomes work, this form of parthenogenesis can produce males as well as females - however, the females produced have weird sex chromosomes and can only lay other females. It’s used as a backup reproductive strategy if they can’t find a mate. This works because in reptiles, unlike mammals, its the males that have two sex chromosomes the same (ZZ) and the females different (ZW). Females produced by parthenogenesis are WW - and that’s what happened to the whiptails. They lost the Z chromosome and now are all WWs.

    IOW?

    Reptiles are fascinating.

    A similar situation is seen in Lepidodactylus lugubris. In this parthenogenic species, one in ~20 (my numbers might be off, don’t quote me) individuals is male. The females of course cannot be fertilised by the male, being parthenogenic, but copulation still seems to stimulate them to lay. In the absence of the male, females will apparently engage in lesbian copulations that also have this stimulatory function.

    Reblogged from: markscherz
  15. rnusicality:

    fun statistics for adults!
    “when I was a kid, I had no help with college tuition, I was hardworking and paid it all myself”
    -Annual tuition for Yale, 1970: $2,550
    -Annual tuition for Yale, 2014: $45,800
    -Minimum Wage, 1970: $1.45
    -Minimum Wage, 2014: $7.25
    -Daily hours at minimum wage needed to pay for tuition in 1970: 4.8
    -Daily hours at minimum wage needed to pay for tuition in 2014: 17.3

    Reblogged from: biologizeable
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