1. ktsaurusr3x:

cvinceillustration:

Finally getting round to creating some work for my 1k Likes Facebook giveaway that I promised ages ago…
Who likes African wild dogs?

AAAAHHHHHHHH

    ktsaurusr3x:

    cvinceillustration:

    Finally getting round to creating some work for my 1k Likes Facebook giveaway that I promised ages ago…

    Who likes African wild dogs?

    AAAAHHHHHHHH

    Reblogged from: ktsaurusr3x
  2. wecanmakeitthroughthefire:

the-scaly-one:

allthestarscollide—x:

reptilesrevolution:

This is a very nice shot of a Green Tree python hatching that was captured by Vladimir Odinchenko and shared by the International Herpetological Symposium. 

I feel very stupid now in thinking that green tree pythons were actually born green…

Omfg wecanmakeitthroughthefire look at this baby omg

omg can we please?! 😍

    wecanmakeitthroughthefire:

    the-scaly-one:

    allthestarscollide—x:

    reptilesrevolution:

    This is a very nice shot of a Green Tree python hatching that was captured by Vladimir Odinchenko and shared by the International Herpetological Symposium. 

    I feel very stupid now in thinking that green tree pythons were actually born green…

    Omfg
    wecanmakeitthroughthefire
    look at this baby omg

    omg can we please?! 😍

    Reblogged from: wecanmakeitthroughthefire
  3. ktsaurusr3x:

    darlingeddiegluskin:

    super-gay-natural:

    esper-sparrow:

    when people get angry at you for liking snakes

    image

    THAT IS THE CUTEST FUCKING SNAKE

    "I am my own blankie."

    "If you don’t like snakes, you haven’t met the right one yet"

    Reblogged from: ktsaurusr3x
  4. koryos:

    It’s frustrating to see people constantly term animal behaviors as showing “dominance” when the better word might be “confidence.” Dominance is a relationship, not a character trait; not all confident actions imply that a dominance relationship exists (especially when you’re observing two animals that have JUST MET).

    Equally frustrating is the constant assertion that each behavior always has ONE meaning, without paying attention to context or anything else. Humans can smile in friendly or seductive or aggressive ways; humans can shake their fists in triumph or rage; humans can run out of fear or excitement. Animal behaviors can also have multiple meanings. Context, people. Context and familiarity with the animal and then knowledge of the behavior.

    Reblogged from: koryos
  5. fuckyeahorchestra:

    The Boston Symphony was performing Beethoven’s Ninth. In the piece, there’s a long passage about 20 minutes during which the double basses have nothing to do. Rather than sit around the whole time looking stupid, some bassists decided to sneak offstage and go to the tavern next door for a quick one. After slamming several beers in quick succession (as double bassists are prone to do), one of them looked at his watch. “Hey! We need to get back!”

    "No need to panic," said a fellow bassist.

    "I thought we might need some extra time, so I tied the last few pages of the conductor’s score together with string. It’ll take him a few minutes to get it untangled."

    A few moments later they staggered back to the concert hall and took their places in the orchestra. About this time, a member of the audience noticed the conductor seemed a bit edgy and said as much to her companion.

    "Well, of course," said her companion. "Don’t you see?
    It’s the bottom of the Ninth, the score is tied, and the bassists are loaded.”

    Reblogged from: theeleganteuropeanwoman
  6. dendroica:

Magpies ‘don’t steal shiny objects’

Magpies do not steal trinkets and are positively scared of shiny objects, according to new research. The study appears to redeem the myth of the “thieving magpie”, which pervades European folklore.
It is widely believed that magpies have a compulsive urge to steal sparkly things for their nests. But Exeter University scientists show that the birds are actually nervous of such objects, presumably because they are novel and may prove dangerous.
The study involved a pile of shiny items (metal screws, small foil rings, and a small rectangular piece of aluminium foil), and a pile of the same objects covered with matt blue paint.
Researchers placed mounds of edible nuts just 30cm away from each of the collected objects. In 64 tests during feeding, magpies picked up a shiny object only twice - and discarded it immediately. The birds essentially ignored or avoided both shiny and blue objects, and often fed less when they were present.
Lead author Dr Toni Shephard said: “We did not find evidence of an unconditional attraction to shiny objects in magpies. Instead, all objects prompted responses indicating neophobia – fear of new things.
“We suggest that humans notice when magpies occasionally pick up shiny objects because they believe the birds find them attractive, while it goes unnoticed when magpies interact with less eye-catching items. It seems likely that the folklore surrounding them is a result of cultural generalisation and anecdotes rather than evidence.”

(via BBC News)

    dendroica:

    Magpies ‘don’t steal shiny objects’

    Magpies do not steal trinkets and are positively scared of shiny objects, according to new research. The study appears to redeem the myth of the “thieving magpie”, which pervades European folklore.

    It is widely believed that magpies have a compulsive urge to steal sparkly things for their nests. But Exeter University scientists show that the birds are actually nervous of such objects, presumably because they are novel and may prove dangerous.

    The study involved a pile of shiny items (metal screws, small foil rings, and a small rectangular piece of aluminium foil), and a pile of the same objects covered with matt blue paint.

    Researchers placed mounds of edible nuts just 30cm away from each of the collected objects. In 64 tests during feeding, magpies picked up a shiny object only twice - and discarded it immediately. The birds essentially ignored or avoided both shiny and blue objects, and often fed less when they were present.

    Lead author Dr Toni Shephard said: “We did not find evidence of an unconditional attraction to shiny objects in magpies. Instead, all objects prompted responses indicating neophobia – fear of new things.

    “We suggest that humans notice when magpies occasionally pick up shiny objects because they believe the birds find them attractive, while it goes unnoticed when magpies interact with less eye-catching items. It seems likely that the folklore surrounding them is a result of cultural generalisation and anecdotes rather than evidence.”

    (via BBC News)

    Reblogged from: frejkya
  7. nedahoyin:

    kia-kaha-winchesters:

    shogunofyellow:

    nature is rad

    These are the most stunning nature photos I have ever seen

    Aminals..

    Reblogged from: thingsofthewild
  8. Reblogged from: biologizeable
  9. dendroica:

Bird of the Week: Military Macaw

The Military Macaw probably got its name from the military personnel who first imported the birds to Europe as pets. In the wild, this parrot occurs in three subspecies throughout a large but fragmented range extending from Mexico to Argentina.
Like the Great Green, Blue-throated, and Lear’s Macaws, these beautiful and intelligent parrots are popular cage birds, widely captured for the pet trade within their home countries. Another major threat to these macaws is habitat loss, caused mainly by deforestation for agriculture and settlement.
Like other parrots, Military Macaws are quite noisy; their raucous calls and shrieks can be heard far and wide as flocks travel between roosts, nests, and feeding sites. Favored foraging areas are the highest outer branches of trees, where these macaws forage for fruits and nuts. They nest in tree cavities and on high cliff faces. Once mated, pairs stay together for life…
(read more)

    dendroica:

    Bird of the Week: Military Macaw

    The Military Macaw probably got its name from the military personnel who first imported the birds to Europe as pets. In the wild, this parrot occurs in three subspecies throughout a large but fragmented range extending from Mexico to Argentina.

    Like the Great Green, Blue-throated, and Lear’s Macaws, these beautiful and intelligent parrots are popular cage birds, widely captured for the pet trade within their home countries. Another major threat to these macaws is habitat loss, caused mainly by deforestation for agriculture and settlement.

    Like other parrots, Military Macaws are quite noisy; their raucous calls and shrieks can be heard far and wide as flocks travel between roosts, nests, and feeding sites. Favored foraging areas are the highest outer branches of trees, where these macaws forage for fruits and nuts. They nest in tree cavities and on high cliff faces. Once mated, pairs stay together for life…

    (read more)

    Reblogged from: rhamphotheca
  10. princeowl:

    really sick of seeing so much hate directed towards the police on here. look, we get it, you prefer sting’s solo work, i like it too alright? that doesnt mean ‘every little thing she does is magic’ and ‘can’t stand losing you’ arent awesome jams. ‘roxanne’ and ‘don’t stand so close to me’ are classic, don’t even get me started on ‘spirits in the material world’. just stop ok? 

    Reblogged from: biologizeable
  11. ornithologia:

raptorwing:

A leucistic (partially-albino) red-tailed hawk coming in to land on a glove.

Red-tailed Hawk
Order: Accipitriformes
Family: Accipitridae

    ornithologia:

    raptorwing:

    A leucistic (partially-albino) red-tailed hawk coming in to land on a glove.

    Red-tailed Hawk

    Order: Accipitriformes

    Family: Accipitridae

    Reblogged from: biologizeable
  12. edwardspoonhands:

    pyrrhiccomedy:

    edens-blog:

    heartbeatofatimelord:

    physcoaustin:

    tardisol:

    IF YOU HAD ROOM WITH ABSOLUTELY NOTHING IN IT AND THE WALLS CEILING AND FLOOR WERE MADE OF MIRROR WHAT WOULD IT LOOK LIKE IN THE MIRRORS

    No.

    Holy shit I asked my dad who’s a physics teacher and he just looked at me, looked at the table, looked at me, tried not to smile, looked angry, and started to look up where you can buy big mirrors.

    image

    this is an actual room of mirrors.

    as you can see, it leads to glitches in the matrix

    Pshh. This is some entry-level nerd shit. Stand back.

    It would be dark, obviously. If there’s nothing in the room, I assume there’s also no light source in the room. Mirrors reflect light. No light, and it’s just a room with glass walls.

    "Fine, smarty-pants, then there’s a light source."

    Okay, then the mirrors would infinitely reflect the lamp, or whatever.

    "Ugh, then there’s just a magic floating ball of light in the middle of the room. No lamp."

    That’s just a lamp with no sharp edges, if you think about it.

    "UGH. Just imagine that the room is UNIFORMLY LIT, but not FROM anything. Or a laser beam just, like, HAPPENED."

    Okay, well if we’re suspending the laws of physics now in this hypothetical scenario, we have to clarify a few points:

    - Do the mirrors join each other perfectly at the corners, floor, and ceiling; i.e., with no cracks?

    In the real world this would be next to impossible; the gap between each mirror would need to be significantly smaller than one wavelength of light. If not, what you’d predominantly see reflected would be those cracks. That’s one of the things that’s happening in the picture above. For this reason, this hypothetical is usually posed as a perfectly-smooth mirrored sphere, to avoid needing to talk about cracks and corners.

    - Are these perfect mirrors?

    That is, do they reflect 100% of all light on all wavelengths? Because perfect mirrors kind of don’t really exist. Did you know that your bathroom mirror only reflects about 25% of the light energy that strikes it back at you? The mirrors used in laser laboratories can get up to 80 or 90%, and I read about a mirror developed at MIT recently which apparently reflects more than 98% of light energy. The light energy which doesn’t bounce off the mirror is absorbed by it instead: at which point it becomes heat. Even if you had a mirror so good that only 0.0000001% of its light energy was converted into heat energy on every bounce, your light would still dissipate almost instantly, because of how fast light travels (and, therefore, how many bounces it makes per second).

    - Is there air in the room?

    Yeah—you know how I said that light energy becomes heat energy when it bounces off of an imperfect mirror (or, if you prefer, ‘literally anything’)? Well, passing through all those atoms and molecules it encounters in the air takes the same kind of toll. If you don’t want your light to be reduced to heat-mush before you can finish blinking your eyes, you’d need your room to be a perfect vacuum. And perfect vacuums? Yeah, those don’t exist either.

    UGHHHHHH. YES, okay, the room is PERFECTLY spherical, it’s coated in a PERFECT mirror, and it contains a PERFECT vacuum. Just tell me what it looks like, oh my God!”

    Well…it doesn’t look like anything.

    I mean…’looking’ implies the existence of an observer, right? You have constructed a hypothetical chamber which could not admit an observer of any kind. As soon as you cut a hole in the room to take a peak inside, all of the light would escape/be converted into a heat, and you’d be left with total darkness again. Even if you could construct a room like the one you’re describing, there’d be no way to know what was happening inside it!

    I WILL EAT YOU.

    —BUT: hypothetically, it wouldn’t be dark in there before you messed it up.

    It would be white.

    A perfectly featureless, perfectly regular, perfectly boring white room.

    What did you expect? Light, visible light anyway, is white. You see colors when photons are absorbed by the atoms of a substrate, but we’ve already determined that these are perfect mirrors, so no photons are being absorbed. In your perfect mirror room, there is nothing to see: just light, bouncing around into infinity, doing nothing whatsoever of any interest.

    Aria Heller, Everyone.

    Reblogged from: edwardspoonhands
  13. ktsaurusr3x:

    urbpan:

    yeevil:

    amaluelmwood:

    annethecatdetective:

    moonblossom:

    beben-eleben:

    Octopus-Inspired Design Ideas

    I require all of these.

    My design aesthetic is tentacles. Tentacles everywhere.

    thezombiemessia lookit

      indecisivebeewolf

    I’ll take two of each, please

    thesmileoctopus
    I found you a thing
    Reblogged from: ktsaurusr3x
  14. jtotheizzoe:

    Joe Does the Ice Bucket Challenge!!

    I’m a little late, but hey, no one challenged me until this weekend!

    Of course, being “late” to something like this shines light on something we all need to remember when we’re watching, dumping, and donating: Next year, we won’t be talking about the IBC, or ALS, but people will still be dying from the disease. $50 million+ has been raised, but we need to do more.

    In that spirit, I included a special message at the end that I hope everyone will take to heart.

    Donate:
    http://www.alsa.org/donate/
    http://www.als.net/

    In other news, maybe I should do more videos on my personal channel.

    Reblogged from: jtotheizzoe
  15. asylum-art:

    Alexandra Khitrova:Fantasy Illustrations

    (Alexandra Khitrova) on deviantART, on Behance,

    Designer Alexandra Khitrova Discovers a New Career through Her Stunning Fantasy Concept Artby Christopher Jobson on May 17, 2014. The reaction online and off was swift, and Khitrova soon found herself working on increasingly complex drawings as she suddenly began to get commissions. Now, only a year later, she is already working with a team of writers and artists on a feature film.

    Reblogged from: sharksmile
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